Welcome to My Red Cape. Long ago in another time my husband Jack and I lived in a little old red house. It was the stuff of dreams to us for the few years that we were there. I live there still a number of hours every day in imagination, with old dolls and paintings and fabrics and feather trees. I draw inspiration and happiness from the memories of that space in time and share some of it here with friends who remember how to step with Alice through the looking glass and take delight in whimsies and antiquities.

For more than sixty years I have studied, collected, repaired, and bought and sold antique dolls. They have been back ground music in my life at every stage, sometimes louder, sometimes subdued, but always there with me. To see only the posts about dolls on this blog, click the banner on the right titled Dolls for My Red Cape. Keep clicking “Older Posts” to see more. Some of the posts featuring rug hooking are gathered under the banner For Cathy. From time to time items are offered for sale under the banner “O’Neill’s Antiques” which was our shop name for many years. ~Edyth O’Neill

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Dolls at Penny's house

My friend Penny enjoys toys and dolls and bears and birds and places them in her home charmingly.  Pieces in a collection are pretty in a group so most of her dolls are gathered in a guest bedroom. But a few others are tucked here and there nicely.   Barb and I were visiting Penny last week so I took a few pictures to share with friends here.
I could stand here and look and enjoy this corner for an hour and not see it all. Bits of early textiles tucked in and used as doll clothing also add to the setting immensely.   Three little Calico books of Tasha's are on a shelf.  A tiny doll by Dixie Redmond sits in a cradle. Several Steiff animals are part of the mix, and of course some of the doll furniture was made by my husband Jack O'Neill.  The tin sconce is an early piece by Jim De Curtin. (Someone who knows please correct my spelling so I can do it right.)


A large beautiful Jenny Lind Bun China sits in the center.

Here is the award winning precious little Cinderella made by Jan Conwell.
There are friendly mice on her head scarf and shoulder as well as a wee bird on top of her broom.




Penny is an accomplished weaver. On top of her loom are sample ends of a coverlet and a blue and white blanket she has woven. Peeking out behind is a red and mustard floor cloth just completed for a friend. Barb especially enjoyed the weaving.

There are treasures to enjoy in every room, A cupboard Jack made is filled with pearlware by Penny's talented friend Denise.  The wooden candle sticks were made by Jack also.
This grouping is in a third bedroom. Penny made the bear, one of several she has tucked around.

I apologize for the glare, but wanted to show the little redware plate the doll is holding made years ago by Nancy C.

In  the living room is a ship model made by a brother in law. I hope to borrow it for a still life painting I am planning.  e



7 comments:

  1. Wonderful pictures to look at over and over again! Thank you, Edyth!!

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  2. How special! It's like a living museum.

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  3. Oops! I forgot to sign my name. With thanks from Barbara S. in Parrish, FL
    Wonderful pictures of your friends' dolls.

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  4. Thank you for catching the beauty of her wonderful home. It made my day!

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  5. Love it all, Edyth! The doll in indigo especially caught my eye! How interesting to have such a historically important skill like weaving. The displays show everything off to their best!

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  6. I appreciate comments so much. The doll in Indigo is an American Greiner of the 1870's, Philadelphia. Penny bought her from us after Jack and I brought her home on one of the buying trips for our shop.

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  7. Hi Edyth,

    I just love your blog and the wonderful photos! You're such an inspiration!

    All the best,
    Laura

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