Welcome to My Red Cape. Long ago in another time my husband Jack and I lived in a little old red house. It was the stuff of dreams to us for the few years that we were there. I live there still a number of hours every day in imagination, with old dolls and paintings and fabrics and feather trees. I draw inspiration and happiness from the memories of that space in time and share some of it here with friends who remember how to step with Alice through the looking glass and take delight in whimsies and antiquities.

For more than sixty years I have studied, collected, repaired, and bought and sold antique dolls. They have been back ground music in my life at every stage, sometimes louder, sometimes subdued, but always there with me. To see only the posts about dolls on this blog, click the banner on the right titled Dolls for My Red Cape. Keep clicking “Older Posts” to see more. Some of the posts featuring rug hooking are gathered under the banner For Cathy. From time to time items are offered for sale under the banner “O’Neill’s Antiques” which was our shop name for many years. ~Edyth O’Neill

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Christmas Fences

Sunday Dec 5th early am, update
Nice buy on ebay tonight for twig fence sections. Easy to add back a few missing twigs.   Marked Germany
http://www.ebay.com/itm/VTG-PUTZ-WOOD-STICK-FENCE-GERMAN-CHRISTMAS-VILLAGE-60-INCHES-TOTAL-FOOT-BRIDGE-/281874447293?hash=item41a106bbbd:g:Yo4AAOSwNphWYGGE


Mending fences is not just a rancher's chore.  The little antique ones to go around Christmas trees can need a bit of help sometimes too.  The ones I have bought in the past have mostly been found in Pennsylvania.  I have owned and sold them in many styles over the years.   I have some long pieces of green fence which stay out year round on top of two glass doll cases.  This uses 8 feet of it, but I have more that matches it.


 Perhaps someone will make a square fence for a table top tree from this large fence someday like this one I use around my feather tree.


Some of the more sought after of the smaller scale fence is twig fence, marked Germany on the bottom.  I have had yards and yards of this and am so glad it was sold before our house fire in which so many wonderful Christmas treasures were lost.  Twig fence is particularly charming in a Putz scene, but is also effective used around tiny feather trees.  Fences were made of metal sometimes, and of Feathered wire like the feather trees, and also of wire or wire and wood combinations.

I watch for Old Christmas things all year long, and here is the square fenced tree base I bought from Barbara this summer.  It came to me with some ill advised spontaneous paint additions in red and green on the outside of the palings only.  I elected to  match the older ivory white paint and try to reverse the red and green added paint.  Note I did not say original ivory paint, as close inspection shows this little fence was originally dark green! However the square base has no trace of green under paint, so when ever the fence and base were joined, they were given a unifying coat of ivory white. I only painted over the red and green, not the entire piece.


The result pleases me, as it still shows wear on its old paint. Beside the fence is a long garland of beads I bought from Trisha in September, another piece of sweet old Christmas trim..
 
 Here is a combination fence and table to make a great tree stand, I have never seen this form before! Thank you Tricia L for sharing this charming antique.
 
The dolls like to have their tree up for a long time, I am late getting to this this year. Even though our family is planning Thanksgiving dinner still,  I am thinking beyond that to two early December parties I hope to have here.
I will make a big peach cobbler pie for Thanksgiving at Beth and Gary's
 house.  Great Granddaughter Bailey will make two pumpkin pies. That recipe came from Judy K how many years ago!  close to 40!  
 
In a side bar of this blog, there is a banner to click that takes you to a list of short slide shows. One of the slide shows is Red Cape Christmas, showing Christmas decorations in our old house.   e

6 comments:

  1. Beautiful slide show, Edyth. Thank you so much for sharing. ...jan

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  2. Thank you for sharing your expertise, Edyth! I never knew that Christmas fencing was made to look like twig fencing!

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  3. Christmas fencing is very interesting. I have a very old Christmas table with fencing that was originally made onto it around the top. I have never seen another quite like it. I plan to get it out this Christmas for use with my antique feather tree.

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    1. Would you send a picture to me to share here? That sounds like a great piece!

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    2. Edyth, I would be glad to share a picture of it with you if you don't mind waiting until I decorate for Christmas. That's usually soon after Thanksgiving. I will set it up with an antique feather tree. It really is unique and I feel it was homemade, but fairly old. I'd love for you to see it. Also, do you remember me? Tricia L.? The one Cordelia lives with.

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  4. Dear Trisha Yes I remember you very much. Are you still working at the museum house? And you corresponded about antiques a little with my father in law before his passing. That was so nice for him.
    Now with that said I apologize that maybe 90% of people I used to know I no longer can connect with. Old age is a time of meeting old friends again for new friends I think. I will be 85 in January and am still pretty active but I wish everyone had a name tag on! With having an antique shop for 30 years and seeing thousands of people at antique shows we set up in and hundreds and hundreds of rug hookers I have met, my memory just gave up. There are over 110 members in my little local art club another 45 in the brass bells another 60 in the Fredericksburg antique collectors group and this does not count on line friends of which there are many, Shirley in California, dear Sage are you reading here? We are all connected in so many good ways.

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